Building Outdoor Kitchen

responsive

Building Outdoor Kitchen

1. Don’t forget an insulated grill jacket when using combustible materials. So many outdoor kitchens have gone down in flames because an insulated grill jacket was not installed with the grill. While insulated jackets are not the most glamorous item to think about having in your outdoor kitchen, it is an absolute necessity when building your outdoor kitchen with any combustible materials (treated or not). Insulated grill jackets surround your grill, keeping your outdoor kitchen structure cool, preventing any burning or warping. Also, insulated grill jackets support and protect your grills undercarriage from weathering and corrosion, which will help it last longer. Don’t put your beautiful new outdoor kitchen (along with your home and property) at risk. Installing an insulated grill jacket will ensure your outdoor kitchen remains protected and will last for many years of cookouts. Note: Not all brands offer insulated grill jackets for their grills. If you need an insulated grill jacket, make sure you purchase your grill from a brand that offers one. Shop All Insulated Grill Jackets

Building Outdoor Kitchen

This is and Awesome post, thanks and

Building Outdoor Kitchen

responsive

Building an Outdoor Kitchen with steel studs and cement board is the best way for homeowners to diy and save a lot of money. Always screw the studs and track together and do not weld, as exterior steel studs are galvanized and the fumes will make you very sick without proper protection. Make sure your steel studs are rated for exterior and structural use and do not use the thin 25 gauge designed for interior use only. Consider using frame kits like the bbq coach system that has easy to use pro panels and step by step videos that help homeowners create outdoor kitchens with amazing results. Most of all have fun building your new outdoor kitchen. Willie

Building Outdoor Kitchen

Who are the companies making this concrete slabs. Is it possible to get the names?

Building Outdoor Kitchen

Nice instructable. I'm in the planning stages of my outdoor kitchen.

Building Outdoor Kitchen

What would those concrete panel systems be called? I'm not having a lot of luck finding them.

Building Outdoor Kitchen

Hi!

Building Outdoor Kitchen

Technically there is a danger of course. This depends on exact clearances but the BBQ can potentially dry out the wood to the point that it falls apart or even catches fire. Can you use Durock board in between?

best regards,

Eugene.

is there a danger using acq lumber for a built in bbq frame. and is there a heat problem having a built in bbq us against a synthetic deck

Very, very nice. I'm so jealous. Thanks for sharing.More Comments

This is and Awesome post, thanks and

Building an Outdoor Kitchen with steel studs and cement board is the best way for homeowners to diy and save a lot of money. Always screw the studs and track together and do not weld, as exterior steel studs are galvanized and the fumes will make you very sick without proper protection. Make sure your steel studs are rated for exterior and structural use and do not use the thin 25 gauge designed for interior use only. Consider using frame kits like the bbq coach system that has easy to use pro panels and step by step videos that help homeowners create outdoor kitchens with amazing results. Most of all have fun building your new outdoor kitchen. Willie

Who are the companies making this concrete slabs. Is it possible to get the names?

Nice instructable. I'm in the planning stages of my outdoor kitchen.

What would those concrete panel systems be called? I'm not having a lot of luck finding them.

Hi!

Technically there is a danger of course. This depends on exact clearances but the BBQ can potentially dry out the wood to the point that it falls apart or even catches fire. Can you use Durock board in between?

best regards,

Eugene.

is there a danger using acq lumber for a built in bbq frame. and is there a heat problem having a built in bbq us against a synthetic deck

Very, very nice. I'm so jealous. Thanks for sharing.

8. Do your research and choose reliable appliances to keep you happy. With so many outdoor appliances on the market, it can be hard to choose the perfect ones for you. While everyone wants great looking and functional appliances, it is most important to do your research before buying. An outdoor kitchen it something you want to last for many years, so it is crucial to select the perfect appliances when building. As mentioned above, make sure the appliance is rated for outdoor use, and read over any available customer and expert reviews. Research how well the appliance performs and select products that are built solid and made of materials that will last. By doing your research before buying, you are ensuring a smart investment in your outdoor appliances to ensure they will last and you will be happy with your choice. Shop All Outdoor Kitchens

4. Enclosed storage components may not work under a sink or grill. While it’s always convenient to have cabinets, doors and drawers installed throughout your outdoor kitchen, always consider the placement of your storage components when deciding whether or not to buy enclosed cabinets. Many outdoor kitchen owners have purchased enclosed cabinetry to place under their sink, only to later realize they did not account for the plumbing. This is also a common issue with grills, as the gas lines are not considered come installation time. When planning your outdoor kitchen, decide on the placement of your doors and drawers, and whether or not you can install a cabinet, or if you will have to use access doors that open into the existing island structure. Shop All Outdoor Kitchen Storage

7. Don’t forget to leave usable counter space. Of course you want to deck out your new outdoor kitchen with all sorts of appliances, allowing you a ton of versatility for cooking and entertaining. However, in all the excitement of designing a dream kitchen, many people forget the importance of leaving counter space. Depending on how you will be using your outdoor kitchen, it is important to leave enough counter space for things like preparing food, serving, eating and entertaining. When designing your outdoor kitchen, make sure you leave enough workable space for easy and convenient outdoor cooking.

Kitchens are the undisputed heart of the home, where everyone gathers, mingles, and lingers during parties. But to achieve that kind of appeal outside means expanding your outdoor living space. To draw a crowd—and keep them entertained—requires a bit more than plopping down a table and a few plastic chairs. With an outdoor kitchen you can prepare meals and be around your guests with minimal time spent running back inside for plates, beverages, or tongs. Although you could spend tens of thousands of dollars for a custom outdoor kitchen, a basic island is an efficient design that leaves out the complexity of curves and angles. Not only that, with an island guests can relax on one side while you’re cooking on the other, so you feel as though you’re part of the gathering. Since durability is such a critical issue for an outdoor kitchen, stone veneer is a low-maintenance option that won’t need painting or sealing. Real stone is heavy, expensive, and requires the experience of a mason. Cementitious cultured stone, such as the type used in this project from Landmark Stone, is easier to work with because it’s lighter, cuts faster, and lasts just as long as the real thing—all while looking as natural as real stone. Follow along as This Old House senior technical editor Mark Powers builds a simple frame, covers it in faux stone, and then nestles a gas grill in the center to get the party started.

Step One // How to Build an Outdoor Kitchen Overview to Building a Better Barbecue Illustration by Gregory Nemec Building this open-air kitchen takes some time, but with the right planning you can do it in two weekends. As long as you get to the point of coating the frame and lath in a layer of mortar, you can essentially tarp over the top of it and take your time applying the finish decoration. Once you get the counters on it, you can go ahead and use it, working on the stone veneering over time. The kitchen consists of a stainless-steel grill set into a 3-foot-long stone-veneered plywood base and flanked by two more 4-foot bases with cabinets below and 48 linear inches of countertop on each side—one with a working sink. The countertop – here it’s concrete, but it can be any kind of stone—sits 38 inches from the ground, which is a comfortable height for both food prep and elbow propping. It rests on a gently sloped concrete slab to help prevent water from pooling around the bottom, but any structurally sound existing patio would work as a base. The island’s frame is made out of pressure-treated 2x4s and 3/4-inch plywood – an inexpensive and durable construction that’s easier to work with than concrete block. The frame consists of three small, manageable boxes that are built separately and then screwed together to make one long island: one 24-inch-high, 37-inch-wide box in the center to support the grill and the shelf it sits on, plus one 36-inch-high, 48-inch-wide box on either side, with cabinets set into each. This layout allows you to scale the island’s length to fit your patio or adjust it to incorporate a built-in bar with a 90-degree turn. Because the boxes are empty, they can accept steel doors, drawers, or other storage compartments or conceal a propane tank for a gas grill. The outside of the island is veneered with cultured stone, which is lightweight and easy to put on with mortar. Use stones that complement your home’s architecture or existing stonework – round fieldstones evoke a classic New England farm wall, while thin, horizontal stones have a more modern look. Arranging the stone in an aesthetically pleasing way is like doing a big jigsaw puzzle. Speed up the hunt for the perfectly sized stone by first unpacking and organizing all the pieces into piles of corners, shorts, longs, and rectangulars. This ensures you’ll have on hand a random range of colors, mimicking real stone, and keeps you from rummaging through boxes and chipping the pieces.

responsive