Home Theater Room

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Home Theater Room

What type of home theater decor should I add?Start by deciding on an overall theme to use for your home theater design. Do you want to have a general cinematic feel? Then pick wall decor that is representative of filmmaking, like an oversized film reel and clapperboard. If you have a favorite genre of films, find a couple of posters from your top movies and highlight them in simple frames. Hang some deep-colored velvet curtains on one or more walls for the luxurious look that’s synonymous with home theaters, and add some uplights pointed at the walls for subtle yet stunning lighting. No true home movie theater can be without popcorn, but adding your own concession stand is an easy way to ensure it’s always nearby. On a small scale, you can add a table or bar cabinet with a mini fridge, candy drawer and microwave. If you’re opting for a larger investment, go with a full-fledged built-in home bar, complete with your favorite drinks and barware. To mimic a true concession stand, use glass-panel cabinets, a freestanding popcorn maker and soda fountain machine. Check out other home theater pictures to see what fun and functional decor others are including. What kind of seating should I use in a home theater design?The kind of seating you add to your space depends on your overall budget and the level of authenticity you desire. If you’re looking for a true-to-life movie experience, stadium seating is a must. Add platforms and stairs to your home theater design to mimic tiers, and use leather lounge chairs as comfortable theater chair replicas. For a less expensive approach, use the same armchairs but avoid multiple levels, or opt for a deep sectional and ottomans instead. If you don’t want your typical sofas and armchairs, take a look at seating that is designed specifically for home theaters. It often includes features such as snack and cup holders and reclining ability, so you will feel like you stepped into your local cinema. Also, consider catering to those who like to eat and watch at the same time, by adding unique home theater ideas like bar counters with stools. What equipment do I need in my media room?Once again, budget dictates your technology, as well as personal preference. Most home theaters will take the projector and screen route, which can lead to a more dramatic movie experience; however, the picture can be slightly blurry if the equipment quality is not top-notch. A high-definition plasma or LCD TV might not be quite as large scale, but it always offers a crisp, clear image. If you do your research, you can even find oversized wall-mounted TVs that match the size of a projector screen — for a pretty penny, of course. When it comes to high-quality audio, surround sound is the way to go. The best home theater ideas include speakers installed throughout the space, but be sure to put in soundproof wall panels so you don’t disturb family members or neighbors. Last but not least, remember to invest in a good remote control — there’s nothing worse than having to get out of your seat to adjust the volume mid-movie!

Home Theater Room

All Rooms / Living Photos / Home Theater 44,216 Home Theater Design Photos For the movie buff, having a home theater room is a must. Although it might seem like a splurge, watching the newest blockbuster with surround sound and theater seating from the comfort of your own home will really enhance your movie-watching experience. If you’re serious about creating your own media room, take the time to research the best seating and audiovisual equipment. Follow these tips to put your home theater ideas into action. More Popular Today Latest Activity All Time Popular Newly Featured 1 – 8 of 44,216 photos

Home Theater Room

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Step 1: Preparing the Room Without a properly outfitted room, even top-of-the-line home theater equipment will be lackluster. For those with a million-dollar budget, this means thick concrete walls with no windows, solid-core doors with yards of weatherstripping, and sound-absorbing baffles on the walls and ceiling. But for the rest of us who just want to retrofit a corner of the basement or the kids’ room, there are some simple things that can be done to improve any space’s acoustics and lighting. Start with a rectangular room with as few doors and windows as possible. Open floor plans and vaulted ceilings make it more difficult to keep the sound effects in and the barking of the neighbor’s dog out. If the room is oddly shaped, map out a rectangular (or at least symmetrical) space within it to treat as the home theater. Next, cover the floors. Bare concrete, wood, and tile reflect sound waves, which can muddy a movie’s dialogue and make the sound effects harsh. Try adding carpeting or an area rug and outfitting the room with upholstered furniture to help absorb errant sound waves. The same goes for walls and windows — a painting, bookshelf, or drapes placed at the sides of the room will absorb unwanted noise. Thick curtains over windows are doubly smart because you also want your home theater to be dark — too much light increases screen glare and reduces contrast. Keep in mind, however, that staring at a brightly lit screen in an otherwise dark room will eventually strain your eyes. Installing dimmer switches on lighting fixtures will help you find the happy medium.

Home Theater Room

There are no hard-and-fast rules for what turns a room with a TV into a full-fledged “home theater.” At the very least it’s a bigger, better picture with bigger, better sound. But it isn’t just electronics junkies and lottery winners who are going in for home theater systems. Families who want a more engaging cinema experience — minus the overpriced popcorn — are upgrading as well, thanks to affordable options for nearly every budget. To set up a home theater in your house, you’ll first need to prepare a room, whether it’s the basement, the attic, or the bedroom of a college-bound son or daughter. Then you’ll need to acquire the necessary components: TV, receiver, DVD player, speakers. Finally, you’ll have to put it all together. Throughout the process, remember that in the end what’s important is not snazzy new technology or killer specs but how comfortable and enjoyable your home theater is. And whether there are enough Milk Duds.

Home Theater Room

Without a properly outfitted room, even top-of-the-line home theater equipment will be lackluster. For those with a million-dollar budget, this means thick concrete walls with no windows, solid-core doors with yards of weatherstripping, and sound-absorbing baffles on the walls and ceiling. But for the rest of us who just want to retrofit a corner of the basement or the kids’ room, there are some simple things that can be done to improve any space’s acoustics and lighting. Start with a rectangular room with as few doors and windows as possible. Open floor plans and vaulted ceilings make it more difficult to keep the sound effects in and the barking of the neighbor’s dog out. If the room is oddly shaped, map out a rectangular (or at least symmetrical) space within it to treat as the home theater. Next, cover the floors. Bare concrete, wood, and tile reflect sound waves, which can muddy a movie’s dialogue and make the sound effects harsh. Try adding carpeting or an area rug and outfitting the room with upholstered furniture to help absorb errant sound waves. The same goes for walls and windows — a painting, bookshelf, or drapes placed at the sides of the room will absorb unwanted noise. Thick curtains over windows are doubly smart because you also want your home theater to be dark — too much light increases screen glare and reduces contrast. Keep in mind, however, that staring at a brightly lit screen in an otherwise dark room will eventually strain your eyes. Installing dimmer switches on lighting fixtures will help you find the happy medium.

Home Theater Room

For the movie buff, having a home theater room is a must. Although it might seem like a splurge, watching the newest blockbuster with surround sound and theater seating from the comfort of your own home will really enhance your movie-watching experience. If you’re serious about creating your own media room, take the time to research the best seating and audiovisual equipment. Follow these tips to put your home theater ideas into action. More

Most home theater speaker systems (and movie soundtracks) are designed to provide specific sounds from specific areas of your listening environment. When a train goes thundering through a scene, you hear the sound move from one side to the other. However, speakers labeled as bipole or dipole aren’t compatible with this essential feature of home theater, so check before you buy.

Consider room location and size, whether you are retrofitting a room or building a home theater addition. Decide on a layout, create a wish list, and diagram the room with equipment and features.

• Speaker placement. A typical home theater features 5.1 surround sound, meaning there are five full-range speakers and one low-range specialist, the woofer. You’ll place three speakers and the woofer toward the front of the room, and the two remaining speakers on either side and slightly behind your viewing position. Keep speakers at least 20 inches from walls.

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