Lawn Grass Seed

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Lawn Grass Seed

Best Grass Seed Types Cool Season Grasses Cool season grasses are varieties that do well in cooler weather and can tolerate some heat. They grow best in the fall and spring, as well as in the winter for areas in the south. Except for the coldest winters, cool season grasses will even continue growing to a certain extent while under snow cover. Cool season grasses do best when planted in the fall, allowing them to take root before harsh winter weather arrives.Kentucky bluegrass is one of the most popular cool season grasses due to its fine appearance and general all-around tolerance to a variety of growing conditions.Perennial rye grass is another popular cool season grass, providing excellent cover in high traffic areas, making it popular for northern golf courses.Tall fescue, including the variety Kentucky 31, is the most drought- and heat-resistant cool season grass, making it ideal in somewhat warmer areas. Warm Season Grasses By comparison, warm season grasses do very well in the worst heat of summer and tend to be very drought resistant. If you have extended periods when your lawn is brown and dry during the summer, you may want to consider seeding with a warm season grass. When soil temperatures get below 65ºF, warm season grasses will begin to brown and remain that way until temperatures warm enough to allow the plant to begin growing again.The most popular warm season grass, Bermuda grass, is very durable, requires little maintenance and tolerates drought conditions very well. These qualities make it an excellent choice for southern golf courses and lawns, though it is not tolerant of shady areas.Other warm season grasses require higher humidity. Zoysia grass is a low-maintenance grass that produces a dense growth, making it popular for golf courses and homeowners who prefer a lawns that requires a minimum of care.Though St. Augustine grass is not as wear-tolerant as other warm season grasses, it has heat resistant qualities in humid parts of the South and Gulf states that is second to none, though it does not tolerate cool temperatures well.Imported from Brazil, Bahiagrass does very well in sandy soils and is great as a low maintenance turf grass requiring minimal watering and fertilizer, but does not develop the thick, rich look of higher-maintenance grasses.Centipedegrass is originally from southeast Asia and is another low maintenance turf grass that grows slowly, requiring fewer mowing sessions and far less fertilizer inputs during the growing season when compared to other grasses.Buffalo grass is one of the few native turfgrasses in the United States, originating west of the Mississippi, providing a fine, curly leaf and found in many semi-arid regions of Texas and the southwest. Grass Seed Guides Ultimate Guide To Bermuda Grass Seed Best Grass Seed For Shade Ultimate Guide To Zoysia Grass Seed Ultimate Guide To St. Augustine Grass Seed Ultimate Guide to Buffalo Grass Seed All  Yard Care Guides ATV Spreader Buyers Guide Chippers & Shredders Buyers Guide Compost Bin Buyers Guide Drop Spreaders Buyers Guide Handheld Spreader Buyers Guide Leaf Blowers Buyers Guide Pull & Tow Behind Spreaders Buyers Guide Rain Barrel Buyers Guide Spreader Buyers Guide

Lawn Grass Seed

Understanding Grass Seed Labels State laws require labeling on grass seed. There’s a lot of information listed. For the consumer, look at a few items: The amount of the named variety by percent of weight Other crop seeds in the package by percent of weight Any inert ingredients in the package by percent of weight Percent of weed seed in the mixture (if any) Germination rate of the seed. The higher the number, the better In addition to reading the label, there should be a coverage chart to help you determine how much seed you’ll need for your application. Also look to for information on the drop rate for your model of spreader. Seed Blends and Mixes In addition to planting pure seed, blends and mixes are also available. A blend is a combination of two or more cultivars of the same species — for example two types of fescue. A mix is a combination of different species of grasses. Both blends and mixes are formulated for specific regions and needs, using the most desirable traits of each grass type to improve the lawn. Other Considerations You’ll apply the seed with a broadcast spreader or hand spreader. The coverage rates vary based on the type of seed you choose. Read the label carefully on all lawn-care products. Make sure that the pre- or post-emergent herbicides and fertilizers you purchase are approved for use on your type of grass. Consider how you use your lawn. If you have a lot of foot traffic or children playing, look for a lawn seed with a high traffic tolerance listed. Play areas, especially under swings and other play equipment, also need a tougher turf.

Lawn Grass Seed

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Once amending is complete, rake the soil surface smooth and then broadcast the seed evenly, according to recommended seeding rates and using a drop or broadcast spreader. Remember to carefully review the seed package label instructions, as misapplication of seed can lead to unsatisfactory results. The type of spreader you use depends on your turf situation. A drop spreader features two wheels and a bucket for seed. As you push the spreader, it drops seed in a straight path. This type of spreader is ideal if you have a small (less than 5,000 sq. ft.) lawn or want to get seed to a specific area. It’s also fairly easy to maneuver in tight spaces. A broadcast/rotary spreader comes in walk-behind and hand-held types. It spreads seed by fanning it out in all directions, providing more uniform coverage. These spreaders are ideal for large lawns, but make reaching edges difficult. Once you finish spreading the seed, use a rake to lightly work it into the soil at a depth of about 1/4 inch. Don’t bury the seeds any deeper, as they require adequate light to germinate quickly. Follow raking by passing over the area with a roller, which will ensure good seed-to-soil contact. Overseeding — planting grass seed into existing turf — provides the opportunity to improve your lawn’s overall look and health, thicken the turf to minimize weeds, fill in bare or damaged areas and/or convert to another type of lawn. Broadcast the seed over the lawn and water it well. Follow the same watering instructions as for new lawns.

Lawn Grass Seed

State laws require labeling on grass seed. There’s a lot of information listed. For the consumer, look at a few items: The amount of the named variety by percent of weight Other crop seeds in the package by percent of weight Any inert ingredients in the package by percent of weight Percent of weed seed in the mixture (if any) Germination rate of the seed. The higher the number, the better In addition to reading the label, there should be a coverage chart to help you determine how much seed you’ll need for your application. Also look to for information on the drop rate for your model of spreader. Seed Blends and Mixes In addition to planting pure seed, blends and mixes are also available. A blend is a combination of two or more cultivars of the same species — for example two types of fescue. A mix is a combination of different species of grasses. Both blends and mixes are formulated for specific regions and needs, using the most desirable traits of each grass type to improve the lawn. Other Considerations You’ll apply the seed with a broadcast spreader or hand spreader. The coverage rates vary based on the type of seed you choose. Read the label carefully on all lawn-care products. Make sure that the pre- or post-emergent herbicides and fertilizers you purchase are approved for use on your type of grass. Consider how you use your lawn. If you have a lot of foot traffic or children playing, look for a lawn seed with a high traffic tolerance listed. Play areas, especially under swings and other play equipment, also need a tougher turf.

Lawn Grass Seed

Seeding a New or Existing Lawn Seeding a New Lawn Using seed is the most common method of planting turfgrass. Whether you have an established lawn or you are starting a new one, the basic principles are the same. 1. Dig or till to a 3-inch depth. 2. Rake to remove clumps and clods. 3. Smooth and level the surface. Remember, you are establishing a finished grade so include any contours needed for drainage. 4. Add compost, topsoil and starter fertilizer and work them into the soil. 5. Roll with a weighted lawn roller. 6. Spread the seed. To ensure even coverage, sow half of the seed in one direction and the other half at a right angle. 7. Rake and roll again. 8. Mulch with a weed-free straw, such as wheat straw. As an alternative, you can use a seed starter mat or seed blanket to help keep the seed and loose soil from washing or blowing away. 9. Water frequently to keep the seeds moist (don’t saturate). Cut watering back to once a day when the grass reaches about 1 inch in height. 10. Mow when the grass reaches 2 1/2 inches – 3 inches. 11. After it’s been mowed three times, use a regular watering schedule of 1 inch per week. 12. Apply a pre-emergent crabgrass control to stop germination of unwanted grass. Overseeding an Existing Lawn To fill out an otherwise healthy lawn or to add extra green for the winter months, you can overseed: 1. Mow lower than usual. 2. Dethatch if needed or rake to thin the existing turf. 3. Aerate to reduce soil compaction. 4. Amend with compost. 5. Add starter fertilizer. 6. Apply seed. 7. Rake in loosely. 8. Top-dress with mulch, compost or peat moss.

Lawn Grass Seed

Lawn Grass Seed

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Lawn Grass Seed