Laying Vinyl Flooring

responsive

Laying Vinyl Flooring

How to Buy Vinyl Flooring Vinyl flooring is available in either rotovinyl or inlay. Inlay vinyl is made by scattering a pattern of vinyl chips on a backing and melting them together. It’s somewhat brittle and tough to cut and seam, and is therefore not recommended for do-it-yourselfers. The other type, rotovinyl, is made by laminating a vinyl pattern between a backing sheet and a clear wear layer, and is much easier to install. Rotovinyl is available with either a felt or a vinyl backing. The felt-backed version that we’re using requires you to spread glue over the entire floor, whereas the vinyl-backed flooring requires only a narrow band of adhesive around the perimeter and along the seams. We’ve chosen to demonstrate installation of felt-backed rotovinyl over a new layer of special 1/4-in. underlayment plywood. Installation procedures and adhesives differ for each type of vinyl flooring, and vary from one manufacturer to another, so be sure to get instructions for the type of flooring you choose. Vinyl flooring is available in 6- and 12-ft. widths. You’ll save half the cost or more by installing the vinyl yourself. Higher-priced flooring has a thicker wear layer and may have richer patterns, but even less-expensive flooring will last a decade. Compare the flexibility of different floors by bending a corner of the sample. If the backing breaks easily or the vinyl seems stiff, you’ll have a hard time installing the flooring without tearing it. Home centers and flooring retailers keep a few rolls of sheet vinyl flooring in stock. You’ll also find samples of flooring that you can order. Take a dimensioned sketch of your room along and ask the salesperson for help figuring the quantity. Check the installation requirements and purchase the correct adhesive, seam sealer (if your installation requires a seam), trowel, floor filler and matching caulk.

Laying Vinyl Flooring

Installing Vinyl Flooring There’s so much to love about vinyl flooring installation. It’s an excellent way to enhance your home’s beauty while adding value. Its versatility allows you to choose from a wide variety of striking designs, colors and patterns. It can mimic hardwoods or look like ceramic tile. Plus, installing vinyl flooring is a great choice for high-traffic areas since it’s resilient and comfortable under foot. Vinyl flooring comes in three formats. Vinyl tiles are ideal for smaller rooms and attach in any pattern you desire. Vinyl sheets are ideal for larger rooms and cut to the dimensions of your floor for a mostly seamless look. Vinyl planks are also more suited for larger rooms and can look either like a single board or recreate the look of multiple smaller boards. Our experienced, licensed installers will take you through your options, develop floor plans and help you decide on the right vinyl floor installation for your décor and lifestyle. Plus, vinyl can be installed over most existing floors, requiring very little prep work. So you can be enjoying your new vinyl flooring faster than you think.

Laying Vinyl Flooring

responsive

Fitting Sheet Vinyl by Trimming in Place Instructions Step 1 Using your floor plan sketch, transfer it to the vinyl sheet with a washable marker. Step 2 Before cutting your vinyl, place a scrap piece of plywood underneath to keep the subfloor from being damaged. A clean garage floor is a good place to cut vinyl flooring to size. Step 3 Position your cut vinyl in the room, allowing the edges to curl up against the wall. Remember to allow 3 inches on each side for trimming. Step 4 Trim around outside corners or other protruding objects by making a vertical slice down the sheet. Cut the vinyl from the top down to where it touches the floor. Step 5 To fit inside corners, cut the vinyl in V-shaped cuts where it overlaps. Work your way down carefully making several V-cuts until the vinyl rests flat. Step 6 Along the walls, press a 2 by 4 against the bottom to crease the vinyl where the wall meets the floor. After making the crease, use a straightedge to cut the flooring. The floor will expand, so leave 1/8 of an inch space between the wall and the new flooring. Step 7 Use the same principle for the shoe moulding and baseboard. When you reattach them, leave them slightly off the floor for expansion. Nail the moulding to the wall, not the floor. Changes in humidity will cause the floor to bind against a tight moulding. Step 8 If your new floor requires a seam and if you’re applying over an old floor, offset the new seam at least 6 inches from the old one.

Laying Vinyl Flooring

Instructions Step 1 Using your floor plan sketch, transfer it to the vinyl sheet with a washable marker. Step 2 Before cutting your vinyl, place a scrap piece of plywood underneath to keep the subfloor from being damaged. A clean garage floor is a good place to cut vinyl flooring to size. Step 3 Position your cut vinyl in the room, allowing the edges to curl up against the wall. Remember to allow 3 inches on each side for trimming. Step 4 Trim around outside corners or other protruding objects by making a vertical slice down the sheet. Cut the vinyl from the top down to where it touches the floor. Step 5 To fit inside corners, cut the vinyl in V-shaped cuts where it overlaps. Work your way down carefully making several V-cuts until the vinyl rests flat. Step 6 Along the walls, press a 2 by 4 against the bottom to crease the vinyl where the wall meets the floor. After making the crease, use a straightedge to cut the flooring. The floor will expand, so leave 1/8 of an inch space between the wall and the new flooring. Step 7 Use the same principle for the shoe moulding and baseboard. When you reattach them, leave them slightly off the floor for expansion. Nail the moulding to the wall, not the floor. Changes in humidity will cause the floor to bind against a tight moulding. Step 8 If your new floor requires a seam and if you’re applying over an old floor, offset the new seam at least 6 inches from the old one.

Laying Vinyl Flooring

Step 1 Using your floor plan sketch, transfer it to the vinyl sheet with a washable marker. Step 2 Before cutting your vinyl, place a scrap piece of plywood underneath to keep the subfloor from being damaged. A clean garage floor is a good place to cut vinyl flooring to size. Step 3 Position your cut vinyl in the room, allowing the edges to curl up against the wall. Remember to allow 3 inches on each side for trimming. Step 4 Trim around outside corners or other protruding objects by making a vertical slice down the sheet. Cut the vinyl from the top down to where it touches the floor. Step 5 To fit inside corners, cut the vinyl in V-shaped cuts where it overlaps. Work your way down carefully making several V-cuts until the vinyl rests flat. Step 6 Along the walls, press a 2 by 4 against the bottom to crease the vinyl where the wall meets the floor. After making the crease, use a straightedge to cut the flooring. The floor will expand, so leave 1/8 of an inch space between the wall and the new flooring. Step 7 Use the same principle for the shoe moulding and baseboard. When you reattach them, leave them slightly off the floor for expansion. Nail the moulding to the wall, not the floor. Changes in humidity will cause the floor to bind against a tight moulding. Step 8 If your new floor requires a seam and if you’re applying over an old floor, offset the new seam at least 6 inches from the old one.

Laying Vinyl Flooring

Cutting the Floor to Fit Vinyl flooring is sold in 6-foot and 12-foot widths, making it possible to install a seamless floor in smaller rooms, such as bathrooms, halls and kitchens. Allow the new vinyl floor to acclimate to the room by leaving it in the room where it’ll be installed for at least 24 hours prior to cutting. There are two ways to measure and fit vinyl. You can measure the entire floor area. Cut the vinyl 3 inches wider than the floor area on all sides, and then trim the excess after laying it in place. This method works well with rooms that are easy to fit with few angles or obstacles. Alternatively, make a template of the floor layout. Transfer the template to the vinyl, and make the proper cuts prior to laying it in place. Use this method with thicker vinyl or in rooms that are hard to fit because of angles or recesses. Installation kits are available that include paper, marking pen, tape, cutting blade and complete instructions to make an accurate pattern.

Laying Vinyl Flooring

Vinyl flooring is sold in 6-foot and 12-foot widths, making it possible to install a seamless floor in smaller rooms, such as bathrooms, halls and kitchens. Allow the new vinyl floor to acclimate to the room by leaving it in the room where it’ll be installed for at least 24 hours prior to cutting. There are two ways to measure and fit vinyl. You can measure the entire floor area. Cut the vinyl 3 inches wider than the floor area on all sides, and then trim the excess after laying it in place. This method works well with rooms that are easy to fit with few angles or obstacles. Alternatively, make a template of the floor layout. Transfer the template to the vinyl, and make the proper cuts prior to laying it in place. Use this method with thicker vinyl or in rooms that are hard to fit because of angles or recesses. Installation kits are available that include paper, marking pen, tape, cutting blade and complete instructions to make an accurate pattern.

Laying Vinyl Flooring

responsive