Patio Umbrella Repair

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Patio Umbrella Repair

Outdoor patio umbrellas have to put up with a lot of different kinds of weather, and it’s easy for them to their cover torn. Replacing good patio umbrellas can be costly. Repairing a torn umbrella cover is a much more economical choice. The best way to repair an outdoor umbrella that has a hole or is suffering from a tear depends on what kind of fabric the umbrella uses for its cover and the severity of the damage. Here are a few guides on repairing you patio umbrella and how to maintain it tear free after. If damage occurs to your patio umbrella, it is most like to be either a tear in the fabric along the ribs of the extension mechanism, a hole punched through by accident, or fraying along the edges. The first step in repairing is assessing the damage and assembling the required materials. You will need heavy-duty scissors, heavy-gauge thread that matches your umbrella fabric, fabric glue and heavy objects to weigh down glued fabric. If the fabric has a hole, you’ll need a piece of compatible material for your patch. To prepare your umbrella to be repaired first you should remove the umbrella fabric from the ribs by pulling the pockets from the rib end, the remove the finial and slide the cover off of the umbrella frame. Spread the umbrella fabric on a flat surface. Your patio table is often a good surface for this. Clean around the damaged area and remove any dirt or twigs. Using the scissors, snip away loose threads. Repairing a Tear If the tear is on a seam, all you need is to remove the fabric from your umbrella and sew a stitch right along the tear. It’s very easy to do this on a sewing machine, but you could hand sew it to. Just make sure to use heavy-duty outdoor or nylon thread. If your patio umbrella has a long tear, bring the torn edges together, allowing them to slightly overlap. Apply fabric glue to the facing surfaces. Keeping the fabric flat and still. Place weight on the overlapped fabric to allow the fabric glue to bond. When the glue is set, stitch to reinforce. Be certain not to overlap the fabric too much or the large patio umbrella will not open fully. For a small tear where the edges can be brought together, adhesive is usually not necessary. Stitch the tear closed. Again, overlap the fabric as little as practical. Repairing a Hole If the tear is not on a seam, it’s time to patch instead. Check your local fabric store for outdoor material that’s as close as possible to that of your umbrella, or try an online fabric source such as outdoorfabricsite.com. If you’re umbrella is using a premiere fabric like Sunbrella or Outdura, these fabrics are readily available online. Cut a piece about an inch or so wider than the damaged area, fold under the edges, then stitch the patch in place. Because umbrellas are visible from both top and bottom, you may want to patch the underside as well. If sewing isn’t your thing, talk to a local tailor or outdoor furniture retailer and see if they’ll do it. If a hole in the fabric is shaped so that the edges cannot be brought together without bunching the fabric, begin as with a tear. Begin with the outside of the umbrella fabric facing up as a work surface. With the fabric on a flat surface, remove dirt, twigs, and frayed threads from the edges of the hole. Cut a fabric patch approximately 1/2 inch wider than the hole you are patching. Apply fabric glue to facing surfaces. Be certain the patch is on the outside of the umbrella to prevent tracking water through the patch onto protected surfaces. Stitch the edge of the hole to the patch. If a portion of the edge of your patio umbrella begins to fray, you have a repair job waiting to happen. Address fraying early, and you will save you a TON of work later.  Begin by clipping away loose material. With the frayed area cleaned up, stitch along the new edge. You can leave a slight scallop in the edge of the umbrella. Scallop? Yeap, scallop. It’s going to look a heck of a lot better than the tear that will appear if a frayed edge is left untended. Maintenance Tips To prevent new tears or holes, don’t leave your umbrella up when not in use. Patio umbrellas that are up can easily fall over and roll into shrubs or furniture and are more likely to be punctured or torn by falling debris. Store your umbrella where mice or other critters won’t be able to chew it, or poop on it. Yeap, animal waste will rot and deposit living enzymes that like to chew through stuff, including umbrella covers.

Patio Umbrella Repair

The ‘Slippery Slope’ Getting a patio umbrella home seems like a pretty simple thing to do on the face of things. The clear question from the uninitiated is, “Well – How hard can it be?” I have to believe that a good many people have been led to their downfall by asking this very question. If you have to ask, then look out; you’re going to find out! You’re teetering at the top of the proverbial slippery slope. Patio Umbrella box is too long to fit inside car How can something so simple be so hard? The person who coined the phrase, “Trial and error,” was a brilliant observer of human experience. When you succeed at something then you get to stop trying after all. The expression, “You always find what you want in the last place you look,” is another example of the same idea. It’s easy to overlook the energy needed to achieve a good result. You would make yourself look silly if you started calling your efforts “Trial and success!” Beginner’s luck is not unusual, but it highlights someone who achieves success without a proper understanding of what they have done. This really isn’t much of an issue for things that one expects to do only once in a lifetime. It is a problem for those things that you will have to master to be able to repeat again. You need to know what you are doing to achieve consistency. Do it right the first time! I remember working for an executive who was fond of using this expression. He was talking to trained engineers, and what he actually meant to say was, “Do it right the next time.” He wanted to reduce mistakes by people he felt needed an admonition to be more careful in their work. Trial and error, when properly understood as a practical approach to achievement, tells us that the very first attempt at something is likely to go badly. You have to get things wrong in the beginning in order to get them right later on. So how many patio umbrellas do we ever carry around in our cars? Not many, I’ll wager. Here is my first attempt to carry one. A Patio Umbrella loaded into my car I put the umbrella in through the sun roof because it would fit that way. My daughter is helping me, but she’s mortified. She said, “I can’t believe that my Dad is still able to embarrass me at my age!” I got the umbrella in my car all right. It wouldn’t be safe to drive, however. Trial and error, for sure! Simplify the problem A worthwhile strategy is to find a way to make the problem simpler to tackle. Another common expression asks for the proper way to eat an elephant. An answer you might expect to hear in motivational speeches is to find a place to start and then persistently gnaw away at the problem until it is gone. Things are easier and they go faster when you have a team of people working together on different parts of the problem at the same time. Fortunately, a patio umbrella isn’t such a big deal! Patio Umbrella with the bottom pole removed I removed the bottom pole to make the umbrella much shorter overall. It’s still too long if I can’t put the back seat of my car down to get it out of the way. A brand new umbrella still in its original box would not have its bottom pole attached to reduce shipping costs. So how do you get 10 pounds of umbrella into a 5 pound car? This photo shows a much better way to safely get an umbrella home. A Patio Umbrella put over the passenger seat in a car I reclined the back of the passenger seat far enough to make room for the umbrella box. Then I put the box in the car through the passenger side door. The box runs from the foot well in the front and over the seat into the back. This simple solution looks obvious in hindsight, but sometimes the obvious is the hardest thing to find when you’re starting out. Success at last There you have it. A large patio umbrella carried in an ordinary car. I should let you know that umbrellas over 11′ in diameter and cantilever models, the ones with poles on the side instead of in the middle, are unlikely to fit in a car at all. Albert

Patio Umbrella Repair

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Patio Umbrella Repair

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Patio Umbrella Repair
Patio Umbrella Repair
Patio Umbrella Repair
Patio Umbrella Repair