Teak Table Top

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Teak Table Top

White Ring Remover Boiled Linseed Oil February 19, 2014 A. White marks on wood = cotton cloth and ironing Black marks = oxalic acid. (Barkeepers Friend works great). Make a paste, apply, let dry. Wipe off. Redo as necessary. You’ll need to refinish afterwards, but it works like a charm. Heather Carr – Ontario, Canada May 23, 2014 A. Regarding removing water stains on TEAK WOOD furniture, as well as putting moisture back into the wood. Here is what you do. You do not sand or “refinish” Teak Wood or apply any lacquer. Teak wood is natural. Purchase Homax White Ring Removal cloths. Clean wood furniture with a good dusting first and follow the cleaning instructions on the Homax package. I cleaned my entire Teak Wood buffet with the Homax. Most of the stains and minor scratches came out. Also purchase BOILED LINSEED OIL and follow the directions. I used old white tee shirts to apply the oil and another to wipe off excess. Let the linseed oil stay on your wood for 10-15 minutes and then remove excess with clean cotton cloth. You can use this process on all of your wood products whether the wood is natural like Teak Wood or has a lacquered surface. My 50 yr old contemporary Teak Wood buffet looks like brand new. I will repeat the cleaning in about a month since I never cleaned it properly in the past. Hope this helps everyone! Patricia Phillip 1952 – Irvine, California USA December 16, 2014 Wind blew vase off Parker teak tea table and stained it. Followed the tea towel method and it improved a lot. Decided to put some oil/polish on the table when the wood was warm when the pores of the wood were more dilated. This seemed to be a good idea. Will iron table again to try and even it up. Thanks for the tip. Andrew Lee – Sydney, NSW, Australia December 23, 2014 OMG! C’S suggestion of the Iron actually works. I have a Teak Table of my mother’s which is an original 1970’s G Plan. I had a pot plant on it as it has a tile strip down the centre and the plant got inadvertently moved onto the wood part of the table. It left a huge white water mark. Not any more. So grateful for the advice. Many thanks. Alison Alison Bennett – Bristol England January 2015 Hi. We have another thread here where hundreds of readers reported success with the iron and towel, or a hairdryer. What appears to happen is that the lacquer has absorbed a little bit of the water, which causes it to blush or turn into a white oil & water suspension like mayonnaise. And it holds that water at room temperature indefinitely. But get it warm enough and the water is driven out, and the finish once again becomes lacquer rather than a water & oil suspension, so the discoloration is pretty much gone. Doesn’t work every single time 100% for everybody, but it darn well works great for most. Regards, Ted Mooney, P.E. RET finishing.com Pine Beach, New Jersey

Teak Table Top

I just tried Marilyn C’s suggestion (above) and ironed a white teak water stain with a tea towel and it worked very well. The stain is no longer obvious and probably wouldn’t be noticed unless someone was intentionally looking for it. Certainly, it has not gone completely, but it was far quicker and simpler than refinishing the entire sideboard! Thank you very much. Elspeth S – London, UK Thank you, thank you, thank you. It worked! I put a white linen table napkin (tea towel) over the white water mark on my teak veneer rolltop desk and ironed it with the highest setting on my iron. After about 30 seconds the stain was gone! I’m not sure of the mechanics involved, but I believe the oil in the wood was drawn up through the water stain into the napkin which made the stain disappear. Ralph Germann – Honolulu, Hawaii We used Marilyn C’s iron-and-towel trick on a finished oak table that had a water stain from an accident and it worked marvelously. Nick Gully – Denver, Colorado We have had an extendable solid-teak dining table for nearly 40 years, manufactured by a well-known Australian company, Parker Furniture. Recently, it became time to restore and we moved the table out to the garage where I gently rubbed the surface (along the grain) with very fine steel wool, dipped in methylated spirits, The table looked like new again but time prevented us sealing it with the chosen polyurethane varnish. To my detriment, I left the table in the garage then Sydney experienced heavy rain with cyclonic winds recently. Roof condensation dripped onto the now unsealed teak table. I wiped off the water droplets ASAP but telltale white stains remained. I quickly Googled “water stain teak” and found this website. Armed with Marilyn C’s Canadian advice (lol), I tried the tea towel trick. However, the tea towel I used must have been too old — it was linen, hard and thin. I then tried some more absorbent toweling and it worked a treat! As I slowly lifted the hot towel off each small splotch, the towel briefly gripped the affected area of the table — a little like waxing of body hair. Thank you, Marilyn. As you said “It really does work”. Geoff STANWELL – Sydney, Australia I had a twelve inch water stain on my oak table and the tea towel and iron worked in about 20 seconds. I couldn’t believe my eyes and so happy it didn’t need refinishing! The best tip ever! Gloria Price Drumheller, Alberta, Canada January 3, 2008 Thank you very much Marilyn yet again, the tea-towel tip worked. I had 6 foot of steam iron stains from turning up curtains up(I even laid a towel on table to protect it but it still stained) thank you again you’re a life saver Fiona Shepherd – Luton Beds, England March 28, 2008 The iron-and-linen-napkins technique really works. Thanks much. Terry Fisher – Lincoln, Massachusetts June 6, 2008 I have just used the Tea towel and iron method on my teak table. Brilliant result no mark left. Celia Hamilton – London, Britain November 22, 2008 I tried the dishrag and iron trick! It was amazing. I had a ring left from a white ceramic gravy boat. In 10 seconds it was gone. I can not thank you enough, I was so upset. It looks like new! Amazing! Melissa March – Pawtucket, Rhode Island

Teak Table Top

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From Shipbuilders to Restaurant Decorators! Teak Restaurant Tables Choose from our selection of round, square, or rectangular commercial outdoor teak table tops. Teak is a beautiful hardwood that has a natural color tone and requires no varnish or stain. Originally the wood of shipbuilders, teak is the optimal choice for commercial outdoor furniture and is extremely long-lasting. Because it’s a wood, it will moderate the outdoor temperature – so it never feels too hot or too cold to the touch. Because it has a natural oil and a dense grain, teak resists rotting, making it very durable and a great all-weather choice for your outdoor restaurant table top! Plus, its natural beauty fits among many outdoor decor styles.Call us to discuss your outdoor teak table top purchase, or to learn about all our outdoor commercial table options at 1-800-986-5352.

Teak Table Top

We have had an extendable solid-teak dining table for nearly 40 years, manufactured by a well-known Australian company, Parker Furniture. Recently, it became time to restore and we moved the table out to the garage where I gently rubbed the surface (along the grain) with very fine steel wool, dipped in methylated spirits, The table looked like new again but time prevented us sealing it with the chosen polyurethane varnish. To my detriment, I left the table in the garage then Sydney experienced heavy rain with cyclonic winds recently. Roof condensation dripped onto the now unsealed teak table. I wiped off the water droplets ASAP but telltale white stains remained. I quickly Googled “water stain teak” and found this website. Armed with Marilyn C’s Canadian advice (lol), I tried the tea towel trick. However, the tea towel I used must have been too old — it was linen, hard and thin. I then tried some more absorbent toweling and it worked a treat! As I slowly lifted the hot towel off each small splotch, the towel briefly gripped the affected area of the table — a little like waxing of body hair. Thank you, Marilyn. As you said “It really does work”.

Teak Table Top

Q. Hi, I bought a teak credenza a month ago and I put a table runner on it and some plants. Most of the plants I had set on wooden hot plates but two of them I put directly on the table runner. I just removed everything to clean again and the two plants without hot plates under them left big white spots. I cleaned the white spots off and then applied teak oil hoping it would clean up now it is dark circles left on the wood. Some black came off when applying the teak oil. So, next I tried the iron and towel technique and applied teak oil. The dark spots are still there. Any ideas? I’m just sick – I’ve only had this beautiful piece for a month and feel like I’ve ruined it!

Teak Table Top

Teak Table Top

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