Window Blinds Repair

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Window Blinds Repair

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Repair Kit Hotline: 506-4636 November 1, 2000 Release # 01-023 WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the Window Covering Safety Council are announcing a recall to repair horizontal window blinds to prevent the risk of strangulation to young children. The recall involves millions of window blinds with pull cords and inner cords that can form a loop and cause strangulation. About 85 million window blinds are sold each year. Since 1991, CPSC has received reports of 130 strangulations involving cords on window blinds. 114 strangulations involve the outer pull cords, and 16 involve the inner cords that hold the blind slats.In 1995, CPSC worked with the window covering industry to redesign new window blinds to eliminate the outer loop on the end of pull cords and provide free repair kits so consumers could fix their existing blinds. CPSC issued a safety alert about this hazard and what consumers can do about it, including a detailed description of the free repair kits. Window blinds sold since 1995 no longer have pull cords ending in loops. Last year, CPSC began a new investigation of window blind deaths. In an extensive review of incidents, CPSC found that children could also become entangled in the inner cords that are used to raise the slats of blinds. These entrapments occur when a young child pulls on an inner cord and it forms a loop that the child can hang in. All of these deaths involved children in cribs placed next to windows. In most cases, the outer pull cords were placed out of reach, but the children strangled when they pulled on the inner cords of the blinds. The strangulation victims ranged in age from 9 months to 17 months.As a result of the new CPSC investigation, the industry has further redesigned window blinds. Newly manufactured blinds have attachments on the pull cords so that the inner cords can’t form a loop if pulled by a young child. Consumers with existing blinds should have them repaired. The repair can be done in minutes without removing the blinds.Consumers who have window blinds with cords in their homes should call the Window Covering Safety Council toll-free 506-4636 to receive a free repair kit for each set of blinds in the home. You can also visit their web site – www.windowcoverings.org (pdf) – to get more information on checking your window covering. The repair kit will include small plastic attachments to prevent the inner cords from being pulled loose. The kit also includes safety tassels for pre-1995 window blinds with outer pull cords ending in loops. Consumers should cut the loops and install a safety tassel at the end of each pull cord. Consumers who have vertical blinds, draperies or pleated shades with continuous loop cords should request special tie-downs to prevent strangulation in those window coverings. Parents should keep window covering cords and chains permanently out of the reach of children. Never place a child’s crib within reach of a window blind. Unless the cords can be completely removed from the child’s reach, including when the child climbs on furniture, CPSC recommends that parents never knot or tie the cords together because this creates a new loop in which a child could become entangled.Consumers who have young children may wish to consider purchasing cordless window coverings. These are made by a number of firms.

Window Blinds Repair

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the Window Covering Safety Council are announcing a recall to repair horizontal window blinds to prevent the risk of strangulation to young children. The recall involves millions of window blinds with pull cords and inner cords that can form a loop and cause strangulation. About 85 million window blinds are sold each year. Since 1991, CPSC has received reports of 130 strangulations involving cords on window blinds. 114 strangulations involve the outer pull cords, and 16 involve the inner cords that hold the blind slats.In 1995, CPSC worked with the window covering industry to redesign new window blinds to eliminate the outer loop on the end of pull cords and provide free repair kits so consumers could fix their existing blinds. CPSC issued a safety alert about this hazard and what consumers can do about it, including a detailed description of the free repair kits. Window blinds sold since 1995 no longer have pull cords ending in loops. Last year, CPSC began a new investigation of window blind deaths. In an extensive review of incidents, CPSC found that children could also become entangled in the inner cords that are used to raise the slats of blinds. These entrapments occur when a young child pulls on an inner cord and it forms a loop that the child can hang in. All of these deaths involved children in cribs placed next to windows. In most cases, the outer pull cords were placed out of reach, but the children strangled when they pulled on the inner cords of the blinds. The strangulation victims ranged in age from 9 months to 17 months.As a result of the new CPSC investigation, the industry has further redesigned window blinds. Newly manufactured blinds have attachments on the pull cords so that the inner cords can’t form a loop if pulled by a young child. Consumers with existing blinds should have them repaired. The repair can be done in minutes without removing the blinds.Consumers who have window blinds with cords in their homes should call the Window Covering Safety Council toll-free 506-4636 to receive a free repair kit for each set of blinds in the home. You can also visit their web site – www.windowcoverings.org (pdf) – to get more information on checking your window covering. The repair kit will include small plastic attachments to prevent the inner cords from being pulled loose. The kit also includes safety tassels for pre-1995 window blinds with outer pull cords ending in loops. Consumers should cut the loops and install a safety tassel at the end of each pull cord. Consumers who have vertical blinds, draperies or pleated shades with continuous loop cords should request special tie-downs to prevent strangulation in those window coverings. Parents should keep window covering cords and chains permanently out of the reach of children. Never place a child’s crib within reach of a window blind. Unless the cords can be completely removed from the child’s reach, including when the child climbs on furniture, CPSC recommends that parents never knot or tie the cords together because this creates a new loop in which a child could become entangled.Consumers who have young children may wish to consider purchasing cordless window coverings. These are made by a number of firms.

Window Blinds Repair

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How to Fix Cordless Aluminum Blinds Featured Category Cordless Aluminum Mini Blinds Metal blinds are sturdy and long-lasting Great cost-effective option Easy to operate and maintain Shop Now Featured DIY Video How to Shorten Mini Blinds See this and other helpful DIY videos in our Blinds.com video gallery. Visit Video Gallery Hangs Unevenly Raise the blind and then extend the blind completely. Repeat this operation slowly several times until your blind hangs evenly. Back to Top Creeping or Sagging If you notice your shade is creeping up from the bottom or sagging from the top, please look inside the headrail to check for the factory-installed friction clips. Contact customer service to receive friction clips and instructions to install into the spring motor. For shades that are sagging down from the top when raised, remove the bottomrail end caps from one end and look for one or more pieces of steel rod. Remove one piece at a time and check for improved performance. Then replace the end caps. Back to Top Does not operate smoothly Look inside the headrail at the spring motor and check for friction clips. Remove 1 or all of the friction clips and check for improved operation. Back to Top Will Not Lift Gently pull down on the bottomrail to reactivate the spring. Tip: Anytime you leave your blinds in the closed position for an extended period of time, the spring will need to be reset in order to function properly. Back to Top

Window Blinds Repair

Getting your current blinds repaired is obviously much cheaper than purchasing new ones. At Bloomin’ Blinds, we offer full service repairs and installations for blinds, shades, and shutters. Our blind repair service enjoys widespread client trust and customer retention. We’ll come to your home or office to repair your blinds—all you have to do is give us a call. What could be easier?

Window Blinds Repair

At Bloomin’ Blinds, we never pressure our customers to buy new blinds or window coverings. Our goal is the most cost-effective result, and one that you’ll be happy with! Repairs are cheaper than new purchases, and we have the experience to repair your blinds, shades, or shutters and get them looking their best.

Window Blinds Repair

Repairing window coverings such as blinds, shutters, and shades can be complicated, but our team at Bloomin’ Blinds is trained and experienced in making sure your windows look their best. All of our blind repair professionals are knowledgeable, friendly, and passionate about what we do. As a family owned and operated business, we understand the importance of treating our customers with integrity, prioritizing family values, and ensuring that every job is a job well done.

Window Blinds Repair

Window Blinds Repair

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